Contradictory messages emerged from Armenia in 2015. On the one hand, the marriage rights of LGBTI people were limited in a sweeping package of constitutional changes and LGBTI activists were harassed on the street and online. On the other hand, political figures reacted defensively when questioned on the issue, says ILGA-Europe’s annual report.

Although it notes, that amidst the atmosphere of intolerance, there were positive signs of solidarity, the national LGBTI community mobilised in greater numbers than in previous years, human rights activists spoke out in support of LGBTI people targeted after the first ever Rainbow Forum and that Iravunk newspaper was fined for publishing homophobic content and statements from the president’s office continue to insist that adequate provisions are in place to protect against discrimination, nevertheless Armenia stepped back comparing to 2014 and stands next to Russia, which is due to constitutional change that marriage can be only between male and female.

“Rainbow Map” of ILGA-Europe studies LGBTI related laws on discrimination, recognition of family, hate speech and hate crime, legal gender recognition, freedom of assembly, association & expression and asylum. In this respect, Armenian legislation, as Russian, assures 7% of LGBT rights protection.

Among 49 countries on the last place is Azerbaijan with 5%.The leader in the region is Georgia which is on 30th place. Turkey comes after Armenia and is 46th.

Best countries for LGBTI people are Malta (88%), Belgium (86%) and United Kingdom (81%).